Everglades algae bloom

The water stories

The stories IRW published in 2020 on water problems in Florida and California  illuminate some of the many water issues prevalent in the country today. In California, we focused on the neighboring towns of Tooleville and Exeter, one with poor-quality water and the other with clean water. In Florida, we looked at the longstanding problem of …

Pollution, poverty and pandemic collide

In a segregated community outside of an Alabama oil refinery, chronic illness tells a story of racial inequality, poverty and disease as U.S. deaths from COVID-19 surpass 300,000.

Under attack for response to the pandemic, OSHA plays catch-up

This story was produced by FairWarning, a nonprofit news organization based in Southern California that focuses on public health, consumer, labor and environmental issues. You can sign up for their newsletter here.  In the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, infections began spreading at the JBS USA beef processing plant in Grand Island, Nebraska, the area’s …

SBA releases details on PPP loans

After months of legal tussling, the Small Business Administration released detailed data yesterday on all recipients of its Paycheck Protection Program. For months, the agency fought to withhold the release of information about the loans issued to U.S. businesses in the spring. Despite multiple court rulings instructing the agency to release the full borrower names …

Man lying down and undergoing spinal decompression

Patients pay thousands for a back pain treatment promoted by exaggerated claims

This story was produced by FairWarning, a nonprofit news organization based in Southern California that focuses on public health, consumer, labor and environmental issues. You can sign up for their newsletter here. Desperate to relieve their suffering, people with chronic back pain who comb the internet looking for help sometimes stumble upon a device called …

Protests in Miami, Florida

Swept up by police

Protesters arrested after the May 25 death of George Floyd were a diverse, young group of people who demonstrated close to home and were charged largely with nonviolent crimes, according to a Washington Post review of data on more than 2,600 people detained in 15 cities.